Volume 45, No. 2



Volumes > 37 (2010-->) Volumes 28-37 (2000-09) Volumes 18-27 (1990-99) Volumes 5-17 (1978-89)
a.k.a. Cormorant

Quick Search by author or article title:


Successful breeding of Caspian Terns Hydroprogne caspia in the Arctic-part of the new normal?


Authors

TREVOR B. HAYNES, MARGUERITE TIBBLES, KEVIN RODRIGUEZ, BRIAN HAGGERTY PERRAULT & MARTIN D. ROBARDS

Wildlife Conservation Society, Arctic Beringia Program, Fairbanks, AK 99775-7000, USA (mrobards@wcs.org)


Received 4 January 2017, accepted 16 May 2017

Date Pubished: 2017/10/15
Date Online: 2017/07/30


Download PDF

Citation

HAYNES, T.B., TIBBLES, M., RODRIGUEZ, K., HAGGERTY PERRAULT, B. & ROBARDS, M.D. 2017. Successful breeding of Caspian Terns Hydroprogne caspia in the Arctic-part of the new normal?. Marine Ornithology 45: 143-148.


Key words: range expansion, climate change, distribution, sea ice, Caspian Terns, Arctic lagoons, Sterna caspia 


Abstract

Caspian Terns Hydroprogne caspia have expanded their range in the Eastern Pacific, including southern areas of Alaska, over the past several decades. In 2015, we discovered a pair of Caspian Terns on a small gravel island within Krusenstern Lagoon in Cape Krusenstern National Monument and monitored their breeding status until they successfully fledged two chicks. This site is 653 km north of where Caspian Terns had previously been reported to successfully fledge a chick, and represents the first observations of the species breeding above the Arctic Circle or along the Chukchi Sea coastline. The successful fledging of two chicks at Krusenstern Lagoon suggests that this site, and possibly other Arctic sites, can be suitable breeding habitat. Snow cover and sea-ice duration have decreased dramatically in the Chukchi Sea region over the past four decades; as well, seasonal melt-out has become earlier and freeze-up later. As a result of the longer ice-free season, the Arctic may have recently become available as Caspian Tern breeding habitat as it can now accommodate the long breeding season of this species.


References

ANDERSON, S.K., ROBY, D.D., LYONS, D.E. & COLLIS, K. 2007. Relationship of Caspian tern foraging ecology to nesting success in the Columbia River estuary, Oregon, USA. Estuarine, Coastal and Shelf Science 73: 447-456.

ARP, C.D., JONES, B.M., SCHMUTZ, J.A., URBAN, F.E. & JORGENSON, M.T. 2010. Two mechanisms of aquatic and terrestrial habitat change along an Alaskan Arctic coastline. Polar Biology 33: 1629-1640.

BIRD, C.G., & BIRD, E.G. 1940. Some remarks on non-breeding in the Arctic, especially in North-east Greenland. Ibis 82: 671-678.

CALLAGHAN, T.V., JOHANSSON, M., BROWN, R.D., ET AL. 2011. The changing face of arctic snow cover: A synthesis of observed and projected changes. Ambio 40: 17-31.

CUTHBERT, F.J. & WIRES, L.R. 1999. Caspian Tern (Hydroprogne caspia). In: RODEWALD, P.G. (Ed.) The Birds of North America Online. Ithaca, NY: Cornell Lab of Ornithology. [Available online at: http://birdsna.org/Species-Account/bna/species/caster1. Accessed 13 June 2017]. doi:10.2173/bna.403

DERKSEN, C. & BROWN, R. 2012. Spring snow cover extent reductions in the 2008-2012 period exceeding climate model projections. Geophysical Research Letters 39: 1-6.

DIVOKY, G.J. 1982. The occurrence and behavior of non-breeding Horned Puffins at Black Guillemot colonies in northern Alaska. Wilson Bulletin 94: 356-358.

EVANS, R.M. & McNICHOLL, M.K. 1972. Variations in the reproductive activities of Arctic terns at Churchill, Manitoba. Arctic 25: 131-141.

GALL, A.E., MORGAN, T.C., DAY, R.H. & KULETZ, K.J. 2017. Ecological shift from piscivorous to planktivorous seabirds in the Chukchi Sea, 1975-2012. Polar Biology 40: 1-18.

GASTON, A.J. & WOO, K. 2008. Razorbills (Alca torda) follow subarctic prey into the Canadian Arctic: colonization results from climate change? Auk 125: 939-942.

GASTON, A.J., GILCHRIST, H.G. & HIPFNER, J.M. 2005. Climate change, ice conditions and reproduction in an Arctic nesting marine bird: Brunnich's guillemot (Uria lomvia L.). Journal of Animal Ecology 74: 832-841.

GIBSON, D.D. & KESSEL, B. 1992. Seventy-four new avian taxa documented in Alaska 1976-1991. Condor 94: 454-467.

GILL, R.E. & MEWALDT, L.R. 1983. Pacific coast Caspian Terns: dynamics of an expanding population. Auk: 369-381.

GILL, R.E. 2008. Caspian Terns nesting in Alaska: prophecy, serendipity, and implications for regional climate-related change. Western Birds 39: 97-100.

HAYNES, T.B., TIBBLES, M., ROBARDS, M.D., JONES, T., WHITING, A. & WIPFLI, M. 2017. Coastal Lagoon Community and Ecological Monitoring in the Southern Chukchi Sea National Park Units: 2015 Field Sampling Report. Cooperative Ecosystem Studies Unit Agreement P12AC14948. Fairbanks, AK: Wildlife Conservation Society for the US National Park Service. 

HATCH, J.J. 2002. Arctic Tern (Sterna paradisaea). In: RODEWALD, P.G. (Ed.) The Birds of North America Online. Ithaca, NY: Cornell Lab of Ornithology. [Available online at: http://birdsna.org/Species-Account/bna/species/arcter. Accessed 13 June 2017]. doi:10.2173/bna.707

Historical Sea Ice Atlas [Online]. Fairbanks, AK: University of Alaska. [Available online at http://seaiceatlas.snap.uaf.edu. Accessed 21 November 2016]. 

JOHNSON, J.A. 2003. Breeding bird communities of major mainland rivers of southeastern Alaska. MSc thesis. Logan, UT: Utah State University.

KILLENGREEN, S.T., IMS, R.A., YOCCOZ, N.G., K.A. BRÅTHEN, HENDEN, J.A. & SCHOTT, T. 2007. Structural characteristics of a low Arctic tundra ecosystem and the retreat of the Arctic fox. Biological Conservation 135: 475-488.

LACK, D. 1933. Nesting conditions as a factor controlling breeding time in birds. Proceedings of the Zoological Society of London 103: 231-237.

LIEBEZEIT, J.R., GURNEY, K.E.B., BUDDE, M., ZACK, S. & WARD, D. 2014. Phenological advancement in arctic bird species: Relative importance of snowmelt and ecological factors. Polar Biology 37: 1309-1320.

LOHSE, T.G., LOHSE, T.K., LOHSE, T.W. & LANG, A. 2008. First documented breeding colony of Caspian Terns on the Copper River Delta, Alaska. Western Birds 39: 94-96.

MALLORY, M.L., GASTON, A.J., GILCHRIST, H.G., ROBERTSON, G.J. & BRAUNE, B.M. 2010. Effects of climate change, altered sea-ice distribution and seasonal phenology on marine birds. In: FERGUSON, S.H., LOSETO, L.L. & MALLORY, M.L. (Eds.) A Little Less Arctic. Netherlands: Springer. pp. 179-195.

MARKUS, T., STROEVE, J.C. & MILLER, J. 2009. Recent changes in Arctic sea ice melt onset, freezeup, and melt season length. Journal of Geophysical Research 114: 1-14.

McCAFFERY, B.J., HARDWOOD, C.M. & MORGART, J.R. 1997. First nests of Caspian Terns (Sterna caspia) for Alaska and the Bering Sea. Pacific Seabirds 24: 71-72.

MOE, B., STEMPNIEWICZ, L., JAKUBAS, D., ET AL. 2009. Climate change and phenological responses of two seabird species breeding in the high-Arctic. Marine Ecology Progress Series 393: 235-246.

MØLLER, A.P., FLENSTED-JENSEN, E. & MARDAL, W. 2006. Dispersal and climate change: a case study of the Arctic tern Sterna paradisaea. Global Change Biology 12: 2005-2013.

MOORE, S.E., LOGERWELL, E., EISNER, L., ET AL. 2014. Marine fishes, birds and mammals as sentinels of ecosystem variability and reorganization in the Pacific Arctic Region. In: GREMEIER, J.M. & MASLOWSKI, W. The Pacific Arctic Region: Ecosystem Status and Trends in a Rapidly Changing Environment. Dordrecht, Netherlands: Springer. pp. 337-392.

MOORE, S.E. & STABENO, P.J. 2015. Synthesis of Arctic Research (SOAR) in marine ecosystems of the Pacific Arctic. Progress in Oceanography 136: 1-11.

NORTH, M.R. 2013. Aleutian Tern (Onychoprion aleuticus). In: RODEWALD, P.G. (Ed.) The Birds of North America Online. Ithaca, NY: Cornell Lab of Ornithology. [Available online at: http://birdsna.org/Species-Account/bna/species/aleter1. Accessed 13 June 2017]. 

POST, E., BHATT, U.S., BITZ, C.M., ET AL. 2013. Ecological consequences of sea-ice decline. Science 341: 519-524.

REYNOLDS, M.J. 2012. Arctic Coastal Lagoons of Cape Krusenstern National Monument: Subsistence, Ecosystem Characterization, and Management. PhD dissertation. Greenville, NC: East Carolina University.

ROBARDS, M.D. 2014. Coastal Lagoon Community and Ecological Monitoring in the Southern Chukchi Sea National Park Unit Over Five Decades: Status and 2012 Field Sampling Report. Cooperative Ecosystem Studies Unit Agreement P12AC14948. Fairbanks, AK: Wildlife Conservation Society for the US National Park Service,.

SMITH, P.A., GILCHRIST, H.G., FORBES, M.R., MARTIN, J.L. & ALLARD, K. 2010. Inter-annual variation in the breeding chronology of arctic shorebirds: effects of weather, snowmelt and predators. Journal of Avian Biology 41: 292-304.

STROEVE, J.C., SERREZE, M.C., HOLLAND, M.M., KAY, J.E., MALANIK, J. & BARRET, A.P. 2012. The Arctic's rapidly shrinking sea ice cover: a research synthesis. Climatic Change 110: 1005-1027.

SURYAN, R.M., CRAIG, D.P., ROBY, D.D., ET AL. 2004. Redistribution and growth of the Caspian Tern population in the Pacific Coast Region of North America, 1981-2000. Condor 106: 777-790.

TERENZI, J., JORGENSON, M.T. & ELY, C.R. 2014. Storm-surge flooding on the Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta, Alaska. Arctic 67: 360-374.

WANG, M. & OVERLAND, J.E. 2009. A sea ice-free summer Arctic within 30 years? Geophysical Research Letters 36: 1-5.

WIRES, L.R. & CUTHBERT, F.J. 2016. Trends in Caspian Tern numbers and distribution in North America : a review. Waterbirds 23: 388-404.

WOOD, K.R., BOND, N.A., DANIELSON, S.L., OVERLAND, J.E., SALO, S.A., STABENO, P.J. & WHITEFIELD, J. 2015. A decade of environmental change in the Pacific Arctic region. Progress in Oceanography 136: 12-31.


© Marine Ornithology 2017